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The Other Mrs. by Mary Kubica: FAQs + Books Like It

Updated: Aug 5, 2023

As a single person with less than zero domestic drama in my life, I love reading domestic psychological thriller books about the complicated lives of troubled couples. The Other Mrs. by Mary Kubica is a prime example of this. (Kindle | Kobo | Paperback)


In the following article, you'll not only find answers to the most frequently ask about this particular book, but you'll also find a list of five books like The Other Mrs. to consider reading next. If that sounds like what you're looking for, then keep scrolling. (Warning: This article contains spoilers)

The Other Mrs. by Mary Kubica

What is the Book The Other Mrs. About?

The Other Mrs. is a domestic psychological thriller about a family who moves to Maine to adopt their recently orphaned niece, only to find themselves in the middle of the investigation of their neighbor's murder. Here is the official summary of the book:


"Sadie and Will Foust have only just moved their family from bustling Chicago to small-town Maine when their neighbor, Morgan Baines, is found dead in her home. The murder rocks their tiny coastal island, but no one is more shaken than Sadie, who is terrified by the thought of a killer in her very own backyard.


But it’s not just Morgan’s death that has Sadie on edge. It’s their eerie old home, with its decrepit decor and creepy attic, which they inherited from Will’s sister after she died unexpectedly. It’s Will’s disturbed teenage niece Imogen, with her dark and threatening presence. And it’s the troubling past that continues to wear at the seams of their family.


As the eyes of suspicion turn toward the new family in town, Sadie is drawn deeper into the mystery of Morgan’s death. But Sadie must be careful, for the more she discovers about Mrs. Baines, the more she begins to realize just how much she has to lose if the truth ever comes to light."


How Long Does It Take to Read The Other Mrs.?

According to How Long to Read, it will take the average reader approximately 6 hours to read The Other Mrs. by Mary Kubica.


Is The Other Mrs. Book Being Made Into a Movie?

Yes - In 2019, news was released that confirmed Netflix would make The Other Mrs. into a movie after it acquired the rights to the book. However, there have been no other updates regarding a cast or release date since then.


Are Camille and Sadie the Same Person?

Yes - Camille and Sadie are the same person. In The Other Mrs., Sadie Foust suffers from dissociative identity disorder, formerly known as multiple personality disorder. She has three distinct personalities (that we know of) - Sadie, Camille, and Mouse.


Who Is the Killer in The Other Mrs.?

There are two killers in The Other Mrs. - Sadie and Will Foust. Sadie kills Will at the end of the book in self-defense. Technically, she is also Morgan's (the neighbor) and Carrie's (Will's student) killer. However, because Will manipulated her and used her mental illness to get her to do so as Camille, you could argue he's the one who should be held responsible for their murders. Will also killed his former fiance, Erin, after she broke off their engagement.


How Does The Other Mrs. End?

At the end of The Other Mrs., it is revealed that Sadie Foust has dissociative identity disorder and that she, Camille, and Mouse are the same person. In a chapter narrated by Will, we find out he knew about his wife's disorder all along and used it against her. While in Sadie was embodying Camille, Will would intentionally make her jealous of his mistresses to the point that she would then kill them for him. Will killed his student, Carrie, and his neighbor (who was also Erin's younger sister), Morgan, this way.


After approaching the police, they know Sadie (aka. Camille) is responsible for Morgan's murder, but they don't have any proof (thanks to Will's manipulation behind the scenes), so they let her go. Upon returning home, she begins to realize exactly who her husband really is. Will knows this and spikes her drink, intending to kill Sadie. Soon after, the two get into a physical altercation. Will nearly kills Sadie during it but is stopped when Imogen intervenes. Sadie doesn't let her kill Will though, given the role she played in her own mother's suicide. So, in the end, it is Sadie who kills Will. She is not arrested for his murder though because Imogen recorded Will's confession before she intervened and saved Sadie's life.


One year later, we find out that Sadie, Tate, Otto, and Imogen are happy, living in California, and getting the therapy they all need.


5 Books Like The Other Mrs. by Mary Kubica

If you're looking for other books like The Other Mrs., then you've come to the right place. Here are five similar domestic psychological thrillers worth checking for your next read:


The Wives by Tarryn Fisher

1. The Wives by Tarryn Fisher

The hardest part about recommending thriller books is that I can't tell you exactly what makes two books like The Other Mrs. and The Wives similar without giving away the plot twist. So, I'm not going to. I'm just going to give you the description: "Thursday’s husband, Seth, has two other wives. She’s never met them, and she doesn’t know anything about them. She agreed to this unusual arrangement because she’s so crazy about him. But one day, she finds something. Something that tells a very different - and horrifying - story about the man she married." If you want to know more than that, all you have to do is read this Reddit thread. Just know that if you do, the plot twist will be ruined and it might make reading the book a moot point. Your call!


Little Voices by Vanessa Lillie

2. Little Voices by Vanessa Lillie

If you found the role of mental illness interesting in The Other Mrs., then Little Voices by Vanessa Lillie is for you. Like Sadie Foust, the female main character becomes obsessed with learning the truth about the murder that takes place, even if it puts her right in the center of the police's investigation. Here's what it's about: "Devon Burges is in the throes of a high-risk birth when she learns of her dear friend’s murder. The police quickly name another friend as the chief suspect, but Devon doesn’t buy it - and despite her difficult recovery, she decides to investigate. Haunted by postpartum problems that manifest as a cruel voice in her head, Devon is barely getting by. Yet her instincts are still sharp, and she’s bent on proving her friend’s innocence. But as Devon digs into the evidence, the voice in her head grows more insistent, the danger more intense. Each layer is darker, more disturbing, and she’s not sure she - or her baby - can survive what lies at the truth."


The Wife Upstairs by Rachel Hawkins

3. The Wife Upstairs by Rachel Hawkins

For those of you who are simply looking for another domestic psychological thriller about a twisted love triangle of sorts, check out The Wife Upstairs by Rachel Hawkins. Here's what it's about: "Newly arrived to Birmingham, Alabama, Jane is a broke dog-walker in a gated community full of McMansions and bored housewives. The kind of place where no one will notice if Jane lifts a discarded tchotchke and the odd piece of jewelry. Where no one will think to ask if Jane is her real name. But her luck changes when she meets the mysterious widow, Eddie Rochester. His wife, Bea, drowned in a boating accident with her best friend, their bodies lost to the deep. Jane can’t help but see an opportunity in Eddie. Yet as Jane and Eddie fall for each other, Jane is increasingly haunted by the legend of Bea, an ambitious beauty with a rags-to-riches origin story. How can she, plain Jane, ever measure up? And can she win Eddie’s heart before her past - or his - catches up to her?"


Watching You by Lisa Jewell

4. Watching You by Lisa Jewell

As soon as I found out that Watching You by Lisa Jewell was about "a new neighbor who quickly develops an intense infatuation with a thoroughly charming yet unavailable man," I knew it had a place on this list of books like The Other Mrs. While there are a few other elements that make the two books similar, I don't believe they're too similar that it gets boring. Just read the description and you'll see this book has a lot else going on: "Melville Heights is one of the nicest neighborhoods in Bristol, England; home to doctors, lawyers, and academics. It’s the sort of place where everyone has a secret and everyone is watching you. As the headmaster credited with turning around the local school, Tom Fitzwilliam is beloved - especially by Joey Mullen, his new neighbor, who quickly develops an intense infatuation with this thoroughly charming yet unavailable man. Joey thinks her crush is a secret, but Tom’s teenage son, Freddie, has taken notice. Tom's student, Jenna Tripp, also isn't convinced her teacher is as squeaky clean as he seems. Meanwhile, twenty years earlier, a schoolgirl writes in her diary, charting her doomed obsession with a handsome young English teacher named Mr. Fitzwilliam…"


Every Vow You Break by Peter Swanson

5. Every Vow You Break by Peter Swanson

Last but not least, Every Vow You Break by Peter Swanson is a domestic psychological thriller that involves cheating, just like you saw in The Other Mrs. It's similar enough but not so similar that you'll be bored with it. Here's the description: "Abigail Baskin never thought she’d fall in love with a millionaire until she met Bruce Lamb. Then, right before the wedding, Abigail has a drunken one-night stand. It makes it clear that wants to be with Bruce for the rest of her life, so she puts the incident - and the guy who wouldn’t give her his real name - out of her mind. Of course, that's when he suddenly reappears in her life. He insists that their passionate night was the beginning of something special and he’s tracked her down to prove it. Does she tell Bruce and ruin their idyllic honeymoon - and possibly their marriage? Or should she handle this psychopathic stalker on her own? To make the situation worse, strange things begin to happen. She sees a terrified woman in the night shadows, and no one at the resort seems to believe anything is amiss… including her perfect new husband."

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